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reviews

Michael Nunn - An Obituary

27/2/17: It was with deepest regret that we heard this week of the death of Lancaster 'boulevardier' Michael Nunn, (pictured above at his Civil Partnership ceremony with John Burkinshaw). Michael, among his many accomplishments, was the Principal Virtual-Lancaster Arts Correspondent from 2003 - 2006.

Local Cinema Round-up for 22nd to 30th January 2014 by Peter Clarke

23/1/14: For up to date local cinema links and day-by-day listings every week visit the Virtual-Lancaster Cinema Page. Read on for the weekly round-up, official film links and reviews. A good time for action based new releases with the thriller Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (12A), the violent and moving 12 Years a Slave (15), and a clash of monsters with I, Frankenstein (12A).

Local Cinema Round-up for 15th to 23rd January 2014 by Peter Clarke

16/1/14: For up to date local cinema links and day-by-day listings every week visit the Virtual-Lancaster Cinema Page. Read on for the weekly round-up, official film links and reviews. The period is marked by two new releases, horror with Devil's Due (15) and drama with The Wolf of Wall Street (18). There remains a good range of films available.

Local Cinema Round-up for 8th to 16th January 2014 by Peter Clarke

8/1/14: For up to date local cinema links and day-by-day listings every week visit the Virtual-Lancaster Cinema Page. Read on for the weekly round-up, official film links and reviews. Only one new release during this period with The Railway Man (15), a drama based on a true story (Read on for review).

Local Cinema Round-up for 4th to 12 December 2013 by Peter Clarke

4/12/13: For up to date local cinema links and day-by-day listings every week visit the Virtual-Lancaster Cinema Page. Read on for the weekly round-up and reviews. New releases this period include an excellent Disney animation with Frozen (PG), and a re-release of the classic Mary Poppins (U).

In Review: NT Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

7/9/12: The Play: Christopher, fifteen years old, stands beside Mrs Shears’ dead dog. It has been speared with a garden fork, it is seven minutes after midnight and Christopher is under suspicion. He records each fact in the book he is writing to solve the mystery of who murdered Wellington. He has an extraordinary brain, exceptional at maths while ill-equipped to interpret everyday life.

Book Review: The Architecture of Sharpe, Paley and Austin by Geoff Brandwood

5/6/12: Academic and expert on Victorian architecture Geoff Brandwood has followed his 1997 book on the work of Temple Moore with this history of the Sharpe, Paley and Austin firm, which practiced from its offices in Lancaster from 1835 to the early 20th century.

In Review: The Price

6/5/11: At the end of his script of The Price, Arthur Miller unusually includes a Production Note: “A fine balance of sympathy should be maintained in the playing of the roles of Victor and Walter … Walter is attempting to put into action what he has learned about himself, and sympathy will be evoked for him in proportion to the openness, the depth of need, the intimations of suffering with which the...

In Review: Children of Killers

2/3/11: While many of those of us in Europe may think of genocide in Rwanda as something that was over and done with 16 years ago, put to rest with the assistance of 'Truth and Reconciliation' commissions, this was never to be true for Rwandan survivors. Everyone knew people who had died; many people knew who the killers were. Many survivors were maimed.

In Review: Oh! What a Lovely War

5/3/10: Oh! What a Lovely War The Dukes Review by Jane Sunderland Steeped in irony, Joan Littlewood's Oh! What a Lovely War, a musical dramatisation of the events and development of World War 1, provides a shocking reminder about why we should always, always question the declaration of a war, its execution, and its continuation.

In Review: My Mother Said I Never Should

10/2/10: Now showing until Saturday 27 February 2010, the Dukes' production of 'My Mother Said I Never Should' is a beautifully and cleverly interwoven observation of women's lives over three generations. Like a tapestry with different coloured textured threads – each thread representing the choices open to the women.

In Review: Not The Jazz Festival

13/10/09: Humble Sam took in some jazz at the Gregson Community Centre last month - here's his review... After God gave man Classical music, God gave man Jazz music, but then issues developed in the world of finance, and Lancaster City Council found itself in a fiscal pickle and withdrew funding from Lancaster’s Jazz Festival.

In Review: Of Mice and Men

4/10/09: By John Steinbeck; Directed by Kevin Dyer The Dukes, Thursday 24th September – Sunday 24th October Review by John Freeman The Dukes publicity describes John Steinbeck's own play of his powerful novel of ranch hands, death and yes, mice, as one of the true American classics.

In Review: Vivid Arts at Lancaster Library

20/1/09: It was very dark and very, very wet and miserable at 7pm last Saturday, 17th January 2009. A truly wretched evening. And I had no idea what to do. Should I play chess with my computer? Go to the pub and listen to some bore droning on about football/ his play station/ how things were better in the past?

In Review: Billy Liar

16/1/09: Andrew James Buckley as Billy Fisher by Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall directed by Simran Babra performed by University of Cumbria Final-Year Drama Students review by Jane Sunderland Based on Keith Waterhouse’s novel of 1959, Billy Liar is the story of one day in the life of Billy Fisher (Andrew James Buckley), a bright but bored and immature young clerk, who indulges in fantasies, produces...

In Review: Candle Light Baroque with the Lancashire Sinfonietta

12/1/09: It has been a quarter of century since the CD was unleashed onto the world and what a difference it has made. No longer does the music lover need to stand up to change the record halfway through a symphony. No longer are delicate moments disrupted by crackling and hissing.

In Review: Philip Fawcett’s Piano Recital at St. Peter’s Cathedral

11/12/08: A Review by Humble Sam When our forefathers erected the first churches of Europe to worship God, they were certainly unaware that one day exceptional musicians would perform profound pieces of music in these houses of worship – musicians such as the distinguished pianist Philip Fawcett who appeared live last Friday, 5th December, at St. Peters Cathedral in Lancaster.